Tag Archives: beer

BEER BY THE SEA: 5 FAVOURITES FROM THE MAGDALEN ISLANDS

Last month, I went on a family vacation to Quebec’s Magdalen Islands (AKA Îles de la Madeleine). About a 5.5-hour ferry ride from P.E.I., the Acadian archipelago is smack in the middle of the Gulf of the St. Lawrence, boasting an abundance of sandy beaches, fresh seafood, and spectacular scenery. And like the rest of Quebec, it has a lively local-food-and-drink scene.

Considering the region’s total population is 12,000, I was delighted to discover a thriving local brewery, cidery, and meadery, plus a choice selection of other Quebecois drinks. (I know some people argue that cider and mead aren’t really beer; if confronted by one of those people, it’s best to just nod politely and have a drink.)

Here are my five favourites from the trip.

Chipie by Archibald Microbrasserie in Lac-Beauport, Que.

The instant you board that ferry in Souris, P.E.I., you’re essentially in Quebec. The proof? The onboard bar boasts a selection of craft beers at a shockingly reasonable price and you’re not confined to a little bar to drink them. My vacation started with a textbook American red ale. Unshowy and straightforward, with a lovely Cascade-hop nose and a strong malt backbone.

Pilsner Blonde by Alchimiste Microbrasserie in Joliette, Que.

As you’d expect, the SAQ liquor store was our first stop, where this little darling was retailing for $2.85 a bottle. (In a Nova Scotian store, $2.85 barely gets you a look at a good craft beer, let alone a bottle.) This is no low-quality, high-volume discount beer, though. It’s unusually interesting for the style: light and grainy, with faint minerality to finish. Refreshing after a long day of travel.

And now, the made-in-the-Magdalens portion of our list…

Hydromel des Montants by Miel En Mer in Havre-aux-Maisons, Que.

There’s some debate over just what to call this tasty beverage. The honey-maker who produces it calls it a “honey wine,” Untappd calls it a “honey beer,” and the local tourism website calls it “mead.” Pedantry aside, it’s surprisingly sweet without being cloying. Local chokeberries give it a nice complexity, adding just enough tartness to offset the honey richness.

La Poméloi by Le Verger Poméloi in Bassin, Que.

This charming little cidery is tucked away on a winding dirt road in the hills, about as far from the ocean as you can get on this island. Its store/tasting room is just big enough for four adults. And it is absolutely worth visiting. The owner is friendly and knowledgeable, eager to share his passion. (He invited us to wander around the orchards and explore, which was a lovely way to spend a sunny summer morning). This eponymous oak-aged cider is his Cadillac, and it’s not hard to see why. At 17% ABV, it’s agreeably warm, with the oakiness making it feel like a smooth, faintly sweet whisky. Prickly/spicy notes give it an excellent finish. The best cider I’ve had in a long, long time.

Corps Mort by À l’abri de la Tempête in L’Etang du Nord, Que.

On my last Quebec trip I went to Gaspé and found a pilsner from these guys that I loved, so I was eager to visit the brewery on this trip. I took a trunkful of their beer home, and this English-style barleywine was my favourite. Sticky, rich, currant-sweet, and smooth. With 11% ABV, it’s another big boozer, but it’s so beautifully crafted you’d never know it. Aggressively flavourful yet quaffable. Often this style starts to feel like work after I’ve had a couple sips; this one went down easily, leaving me wondering why I hadn’t bought more. Best beer of the trip (and of the year, so far).

~

Regular contributor and guest reviewer Trevor J. Adams is senior editor with Metro Guide Publishing and the editor of Halifax Magazine. In 2012, he published his first solo book, Long Shots: The Curious Story of the Four Maritime Teams That Played for the Stanley Cup (Nimbus Publishing). You can see what Trevor is drinking on Untappd and follow him on Twitter.

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IRISH EXPLORATIONS: 7 FAVOURITE BEERS FROM THE EMERALD ISLAND

Last month, I enjoyed a family vacation in Ireland. We spent two weeks roaming the island, giving me lots of time to explore friendly little pubs, tour breweries, and sample a lot of great beer. Here are my favourites from the trip. You’ll have to be pretty lucky to find most of them in Canada but if you ever visit Ireland, seek them out. Irish craft beers in general are fantastic and these are some of the best I’ve had.
Cousin Rosie’s Pale Ale by McGargles Irish Family Brewers in Celbridge, Ireland

About 90 minutes after my feet touched Irish soil, we discovered the Patriots Inn, which instantly became our Dublin base of operations. It required a little negotiation to make the bartender understand that Guinness isn’t mandatory for tourists. Once we got that sorted, she poured this textbook APA: hoppy, crisp, quaffable—just the beer to start our explorations. Older versions of this got brutal online reviews; either McGargles has improved its game, or those reviewers need to chill.

 

Bay Ale by Galway Bay Brewery in Galway, Ireland

I ordered this beer because it was the only thing in the restaurant that wasn’t a Heineken product, and I cringed when it turned out to be a copper ale—a style that I usually dislike. Imagine my delight when it turned out to be aggressively hopped, vigorously carbonated, and surprisingly tasty.

 

Yannaroddy by Kinnegar Brewing in Rathmullan, Ireland

At 4.8% ABV, this coconut porter is an easy sipper. Light but velvety, it’s faintly sweet but not cloying, with a nice dark-malt balance. Well rounded and smooth; beautifully crafted, in an unshowy way. Pairs nicely with a big ol’ pub steak.

 

Maggie’s Leap by Whitewater Brewery in Kilkeel, Northern Ireland

There are so many India Session Ales in the world, and so many of them are thin, fizzy, and tasteless. This one, on the other hand, was hugely hopped, offering a floral nose and big citrus-zest punch in the taste buds. Combines the drinkability of a session ale with the big flavours of a double IPA.

 

Tom Crean’s Irish Lager by Dingle Brewing Company in Dingle, Ireland

This is the only beer this little historic brewery makes, so I expected it to be pretty much perfect, and they didn’t let me down. Light, faintly sweet, and malt-forward. The German-style yeast gives it an unmistakably Bavarian quality. One of my favourite lagers ever.

 

The Sinner by O Brother Brewing in Kilcoole, Ireland

Even in this land of stouts and reds, one sometimes needs a classic American IPA. The Sinner satisfies the craving nicely. It’s carbonated with gusto which, combined with the predominant zesty citrus hops, made it a wonderful quencher after an afternoon of exploring Dublin.

 

Wrasslers XXXX by The Porterhouse Brewing Co. in Dublin, Ireland

Before the trip, I asked folks on Twitter to recommend a must-visit brewery, and the majority picked the Porterhouse brewpub. They didn’t steer me wrong; I tried two flights and every single beer could have made this list. Black as night, with a thick pearl head and lacing for days, this is a classic Irish stout; lip-smackingly dry with lingering black-coffee bitterness.

~

Regular contributor and guest reviewer Trevor J. Adams is senior editor with Metro Guide Publishing and the editor of Halifax Magazine. In 2012, he published his first solo book, Long Shots: The Curious Story of the Four Maritime Teams That Played for the Stanley Cup (Nimbus Publishing). You can see what Trevor is drinking on Untappd and follow him on Twitter.

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Austrian Adventure

Last week, my day job as editor of Halifax Magazine took me to the state of Vorarlberg in western Austria. (Read this for background on why I went, and look for my reports from the trip in the magazine this fall.) As you might expect, I seized the opportunity to sample a lot of new beer. I tend to gravitate to IPAs and stouts, so this trip let me explore some styles that I don’t usually take very seriously. (You don’t see many pilsners on my best-beer lists). Read on for my four favourite Austrian brews from the journey, and one unforgettable Belgian bonus.


Mohren Pilsner by Mohrenbrauerei August Huber at the Mohren brewery tasting room in Dornbirn, Austria.
I had an ungodly number of pilsners and this one, sampled at the end of a marathon tasting session at the Mohren brewery, was the best by a wide margin. Light and surprisingly hoppy, clean and refreshing. “This is the beer for fathers to drink,” said our guide. High quality, tasty, and accessible—these sorts of beers are the future of Atlantic Canadian craft brewing.


Wälder Dunkl’s by Brauerei Egg at Gasthof Adler in Krumbach, Austria.
Another happy chance to rediscover a style that I’ve never given much consideration. A beautiful deep amber pour, lively carbonation, roasty notes. Sweet and light, with lingering caramel tones. Paired beautifully with a peppery beef goulash.


Frastanzer Kellerbier Bio by Brauerei Fratanz at Montforthaus in Feldkirch, Austria.
Billed as the state’s first 100% organic beer, this unfiltered little beaut is light and zesty, with just enough sweetness to balance. The quintessential Alpine beer—I could drink it all day. A couple of these are excellent hiking fuel.


Mohren Pale Ale by Mohrenbrauerei August Huber at the Mohren brewery tasting room in Dornbirn, Austria
. After several days of lagers, pilsners, and radlers, I almost swooned when the guide handed me a hoppy APA. Rich floral nose, with a big pop of citrus—smells like a hot day on a tropical island. Dry and bitter, with subtle but persistent piney notes, quaffable but memorable. An excellent take on a style that’s rarely brewed in the region. Fine craftsmanship.


Bloemenbier by De Proefbrouwerij at Schwanen Biohotel in Bizau, Austria.
The restaurant at the Schwanen specializes in organic locally-sourced dishes, and the highlight is the seven-course Wilde Weiber wine-pairing dinner. Host Emanuel Moosbrugger is a drink-pairing wizard; when he heard I was a beer guy, he added something special to the mix. He poured this light and floral Belgian herbed ale alongside the soup course. It perfectly complemented the bright and earthy flavours of the fresh tomato, radish, and daisy soups. I didn’t so much taste the beer as just feel it tingle and explode in my mouth: light, sweet, delicious, tart, salty—and all happened at once. If you’re ever nearby, visit the Schwanen—it’s the kind of culinary experience you’ll brag about for years.

~
Regular contributor and guest reviewer Trevor J. Adams is senior editor with Metro Guide Publishing and the editor of Halifax Magazine. In 2012, he published his first solo book, Long Shots: The Curious Story of the Four Maritime Teams That Played for the Stanley Cup (Nimbus Publishing). You can see what Trevor is drinking on Untappd and follow him on Twitter.

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Cannery Brewing – Drupaceous Apricot Wheat Ale

Long-time West Coast favourite Cannery Brewing in finding its way east. The Penticton, B.C. brewery has been in the business since 2001, starting with draught sales of a few core beers, and growing to offer a variety of seasonal and flagship creations in cans and bottles. This one will be available this summer in bottles at ANBL.

The brewery describes Drupaceous Apricot Wheat Ale as “a refreshing seasonal Canadian Wheat Ale with notes of citrus and stone fruit. A large addition of Canadian wheat gives this beer a slight haze. We added apricots after fermentation to give this classic summer beer an Okanagan twist.”

Appearance: Strawberry-blonde pour with a medium pearl head and tenacious lacing.

Aroma: Smells like a summer day: floral and juicy sweet; you can smell the apricots a mile away.

Flavour: The aromas made me worry about a cloying juice bomb but the brewer got this one just right. Light with enough sweetness to make you remember the apricot, but good grainy balance. Crushable.

Mouthfeel: Vigorous carbonation makes for a prickly palate.

Overall: Refreshing as hell and just 5% ABV, this could be the official beer of summer yard work. If you think you hate fruit beers, this is a good one to make you reconsider. 

85/100

~Cheers!

Cannery Brewing can be found on the web, Facebook, and Twitter.

Regular contributor and guest reviewer Trevor J. Adams is senior editor with Metro Guide Publishing and the editor of Halifax Magazine. In 2012, he published his first solo book, Long Shots: The Curious Story of the Four Maritime Teams That Played for the Stanley Cup (Nimbus Publishing). You can see what Trevor is drinking on Untappd and follow him on Twitter.

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Shiretown – Venezuelan Express Porter

img_0066Charlo, NB’s Shiretown reopened this past Summer after a priori of suspended operations and we couldn’t be happier. Reds, browns, IPAs — Shiretown runs the range, but their new Venezuelan Express Porter is a great addition.

Appearance: Inky black, with faint ruby highlights around the edge when held up to the light. Thick, creamy beige-brown head that’s long lasting.

Aroma: The nose is coffee and milk chocolate dominant. Theres a light fruitiness that sneaks in.

Flavour: The first thing is dark roast coffee, right up front. Then there’s dark chocolate with just a hint of booze. The finish is a lingering toasty-fruity flavour on the tongue.

Mouthfeel: The texture is creamy and smooth. Medium-light body with light carbonation.

Overall: A very nice drinking porter. Coffee and roast malt flavours blend very well together. The light carbonation adds to the creamy texture to create a pleasurable drinking experience.

82/100

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Drink N Brew Turns 3!

Today marks the third birthday for Drink N Brew. Over the past three years we have been able to attend many beer events, have had the privileged to meet and talk with many brewers and beer fans, and of course, sample many great beers. 

To think about making a short list is almost hard to comprihend, but through some thought here are our top 5 beers we have reviewed. This isn’t to say these are all the best beers, but these were great at the time we drank them and have stuck in our memories as great beers that we would drink over and over again. 

1. Brasserie Dieu du Ciel – Aprhodisiaque

An unbelievable beer. Simply wonderful. Full of chocolate and subtle roast and so perfectly balanced. Not at all cloying, but with just a hint of sweetness, this is one to enjoy over and over. Heavenly. 

2. Nebraska Brewing Co. – Apricot au Poivre Saison (Reserve Series, Chardonnay Barrel Aged)

Big, bold, and complex. Apricot sweetness, nicely tamped down by a hit of black pepper. Slight vinous quality from the oak-barrel aging. Every mouthful is an experience.

3. North Brewing Co. – Farmhouse Ale
With aroma and flavours of cherries and dark fruits, this French styled Farmhouse Ale is treat to drink. Malty and dry, funky and balanced. Craftsmanship in a glass.

4. Maine Beer Co. – Zoe

A wonderful American style Amber Ale. Not the biggest hop bomb going, but full flavoured and one of the best red ales we’ve ever had.

5. Bad Apple Brewhouse – Barrel Aged Black and Tackle Russian Imperial Stout

Bold roast with nice whiskey notes. A well made beer showing off the skills of the brewmaster.If you find it, buy it. Sip and enjoy. Smooth: pace yourself, it’s a big beer, but drinks easy.

Cheers to 3 years and we raise our glass to the next three years and beyond!
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~

Grimross – Maritime Pale Ale


Grimross Brewing is a small brewery located in Fresricton, NB. Opening July 1st, 2013 by Stephen and Dawn Dixon, they have a growing reputation for great beers and expanding operations. Maritime Pale Ale is their first offering in cans or bottles. 

Appearance: Deep golden colour with an off-white fluffy head that is long lasting. Nice lacing on the glass. 

Aroma: Big hop nose of citrus, with a slight pine note and a hint of earthiness. A little malt aroma and a sweet finish. 

Taste: Hops – pine and citrus, little floral. Long lasting, late bitterness on the palette. A little malt comes through, a bit more as it warms. 

Mouthfeel: Light-medium body with a medium carbonation that so quite appropriate. Creamy texture, but cut with hop oil. 

Overall: Very nice. Balanced (little malt, but nice range in the hop flavours). This is one I will be going back to and recommending. I can’t wait to see more offerings on the shelves from Grimross. 

84/100

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