Tag Archives: brewpub

A Quebec beer adventure

You know you’re in a province with a good beer scene when the gas station has a better craft selection than your local liquor store. Recently, I took a road trip through Quebec’s Gaspé region, and had the chance to explore some of La Belle Province’s fine brews. Read on for my five favourites from the trip. Note: I’m not saying these are Quebec’s best beers; they’re my five favourite discoveries from this trip. Post a comment below to share your favourite Quebec beers.
L’Épiphanie by Brasserie Artisanale La Fabrique in Matane, Quebec. The best thing about a province with a mature and thriving craft-beer scene is that you find great beers in the most expected places. This little brewpub boasts 20+ taps, mostly pouring house-made beers. This tart, light, and refreshing sour is my favourite. Flavourful without being overpowering, and a great pair with an Oktoberfest sausage that I’m still thinking of a week later.

 

Écume by A l’abri de la Tempête in L’Étang-du-Nord, Quebec. My most common review of a pilsner is “Meh, it’s a pilsner” so I’m still amazed at how much I like this Magdalen Islands creation. Slightly grainy and roasty, with a faint briny character: especially tasty with a smoked-salmon mousse.

 

Rosé sparkling cider by Cidrerie Michel Jodoin in Rougemont, Quebec. Man, I wish I’d encountered more ciders on this trip. This rosé-style cider is a big tasty bomb of fresh-apple flavour: slight sweetness balanced with lively acidity, with tart berry and floral notes. Perfect on a summer day by the ocean.

 

La Gaspésienne Robust Porter by Microbrasserie Pit Caribou in Percé, Quebec. Belgian brewers heavily influenced this part of the world, so you don’t see a lot of porters. But that doesn’t mean they can’t make textbook porters. This beauty is dry and bitter, with complementary hints of chocolate, black coffee, and caramel.

 

Chantier Naval – La Carrick by Microbrasserie Le Naufrageur in Carleton-sur-Mer, Quebec. This isn’t just one of my favourite beers from the trip, it’s one of my favourite wee heavies ever. It starts with an explosion of chocolate and toasted nuts, which quickly gives way to smoky whisky flavours and a long warm finish. Beautifully crafted.

 

 

Regular contributor and guest reviewer Trevor J. Adams is senior editor with Metro Guide Publishing and the editor of Halifax Magazine. In 2012, he published his first solo book, Long Shots: The Curious Story of the Four Maritime Teams That Played for the Stanley Cup (Nimbus Publishing). You can see what Trevor is drinking on Untappd and follow him on Twitter.

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Pump House – Rose Hip Ale

The Pump House Brewery and Restaurant, located in Moncton, NB, opened its doors in September of 1999. This small brewpub has grown to producing many fine ales and lagers and they’ve brought home a fair number of awards over the years including “Brewery of the Year” from the Canadian Brewery Awards. Offering many year-round, local favourites and a quickly growing number of seasonal and one-off brews, this small brewery is sure to have a beer for anyone to enjoy.

IMG_1503The Pump House released their Rose Hip Ale just this summer and already people are talking about this refreshing ale brewed with rose hips.

Appearance: This ale pours with a lively carbonation producing a white head made of tiny, champagne-like bubbles. The colour is a golden, almost burnt orange and is fairly cloudy.

Aroma: Sweet bready aroma upfront with a light fruitiness – almost melon. It’s quite like a saison in aroma with the wheat coming through.

Taste: The flavour of the wheat shines with some spicy notes and fruitiness of under ripe apple and sweet melon. There are some slight floral hints as well.

Mouthfeel: The body is fairly light accented with the slightly elevated carbonation. There is a slight prickliness on the tip of the tongue, otherwise quite enjoyable.

Overall: This is a nice beer. It’s not heavy in any aspect and very easy to drink. Great beer on a hot day. A great lawnmower beer. It changes slightly as it warms, but it probably won’t stay in your glass long enough to notice.

78/100

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-Cheers!

BEER MONDAY REVIEW: Gahan – Island Red

20140414-175413.jpgThe Gahan is a brewpub located in Charlottetown, PE. Produced and exporting by the PEI Brewing Company across Canada, they’ve earned a reputation for production quality beers.

Their website describe their Island Red as:
“Island Red Premium Ale is an amber, medium bodied handcrafted ale with a smooth caramel overtone and bitter finish”.

And what did I think?

Appearance

Amber red colour with a slight haze. Thin white head that left a nice little lacing.

Aroma

Malt with some hops. Bready with hints of caramel. Light toast notes.

Taste

Some malt coming through, but more balanced towards the bitterness. Some hop flavour, flowery and fruity. A bit of caramel. A touch of lemon peal/rind in the after taste.

Mouthfeel

Medium to light bodied. Average or a bit better carbonation.

Overall

Nice, easy drinking North American styled amber ale (not as potent as something from the West Coast). No flaws stand out in this beer, but at the same time it is fairly pedestrian, not to say its bad in anyway, but may not stand out in a crowd either.

70/100

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What will be in store (and your glass) for 2014?

Every year we see more and more people converting to craft beer. People are waking up to flavour and to the not so mundane – this is not a new trend. Since the early ’80s there has been a a steady growth in craft beer – at first it was small, but every year the market share is of craft breweries is growing. Today, more and more beer drinkers are looking for something that isn’t a pale, light flavoured lager, but something that is different. And what was “different” last year may be mainstream this year as many craft brewers are trying to keep up with what their customers want to drink. The craft beer movement has come on strong in Canada and with a fast growing number of brewers in the Maritimes we are on the edge of a beer revolution.

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So, what will 2014 bring?

It looks like big, hoppy IPAs will continue to be popular. The trend in ever higher alcohol and “the more hops the better” philosophy will keep rolling as drinkers can’t seem to get enough and the hop train keeps rolling from the west to the east. “The West Coast has been on the IPA bandwagon for a long time, but that being said, it’s a trend that keeps growing stronger.” says Tracy Phillippi of Garrison Brewery (www.garrisonbrewing.com), “Brewers out west are finding new & creative ways of using hops (hops in mash, hop filters, dry hopping, hops in bottles, etc.)… At the same time, new breweries in Toronto, seem to be starting with flagships styles that have mass appeal, but people still want aggressive IPAs. I think that’s one reason that our IIPA has done so well in the LCBO.”

In a twist counter to the big IIPA trend, low strength, session beers are increasing in popularity. As Sean Dunbar from Picaroons Brewery (www.picaroons.ca) in Fredericton, NB said, “There’s a much longer conversation to be had over beers sometime.” This is trend that not only Picarons sees, but across the nation because, well, sometimes there is a longer conversation to be had.

Local, and experimental beers. Drinkers are looking for the next think. People are willing to try new things that are coming out of their local brewpub and are also looking for the small, true craft beer – they want to know the people who brew the beer. “Niche, terroir-esque, and original beers are garnering a lot of attention in the market” says Jeremy White of Big Spruce Brewing (www.bigspruce.ca), adding “[It’s] going to be an interesting decade in craft beer.”

Sour beers of Belgium. These tart and refreshing beers are one of the oldest styles of beer. They’re produced using very traditional methods, allowing the beer to be “infected” with a variety of microbes that is truly a biological experiment gone right. Though these styles have been around for pretty much forever, they have had a falling off in popularity in their native European home, but are experiencing a serge of popularity this side of the Atlantic. Peter Burbridge of Bridge Brewing Company (bridgebeer.ca) says “Since we opened we have seen an increased awareness and demand for Belgian beer styles” adding that he sees the trend of sours coming to the Nova Scotia market.

2014 is shaping up to be an exciting year of beer. “I really think we’re (East Coast) finally seeing the growth in craft beer that other parts of North America have seen for the past several years” says Tracy Phillippi. “It’s exciting to see people come to craft beer for the first time, because in most other parts of North America it’s a longstanding trend.”

Cheers to a great year of beer!